EPA Guidelines… Exemptions for Fuel Use:
  • Countries not regulated by ASTM, EPA, ARB.
  • Racing Fuel only, such as Nitromethane or Methanol, used in sanctioned motorsports.
  • Endorsed by an agency of the federal government responsible for national defense.
Question and Answer for you…
  • Q. Other than the color & imprint of "W" for water, is there any material or structural difference to the jerry cans approved for carrying fuel vs water?
  • A. No
Safe Use:
  • Non Potable Water
  • Automotive & industrial Fl­uid
  • Deer corn, milo & oats
  • Feed pellets, bird seed
  • Rock salt
  • Oil & liquid absorbents
Exemptions for Fuel Use:
  • Countries not regulated by ASTM, EPA, ARB
  • Racing Fuel only, such as Nitromethane or Methanol, used in sanctioned motorsports
  • Endorsed by an agency of the federal government responsible for national defense
Back in the day:
  • Red=Gasoline
  • Yellow=Diesel
  • White= Drinking water
  • Blue=Jet Fuel (Helicopter and M-1 JP4)
  • Army Green= Fresh lake or stream water (Not for Drinking)
EPA Regulations:
  • Red=Gasoline
  • Yellow=Gasoline
  • Blue=Gasoline
  • All other Colors= Anything but Gasoline (Non Potable Water, Automotive & industrial Fl­uid, Deer corn, milo & oats, Feed pellets, bird seed, Rock salt, Oil & liquid absorbents).
According to the EPA, “Portable fuel container means any reusable container designed and marketed (or otherwise intended) for use by consumers for receiving, transporting, storing, and dispensing gasoline, diesel fuel, or kerosene. For the purpose of this subpart, all utility jugs that are red, yellow or blue in color are deemed to be portable fuel containers, regardless of how they are labeled or marketed.” Learn more from the EPA
We hold our products to a higher standard here at Jerry Can. We Blemish anything that is not complete perfection. Perfection means no scratches, dings, or an over/under powder coat spray of the product. If the product has any significant damage, such as a deep large scratch or multiple dings, this product is considered unsellable and is automatically scrapped.
The U.S. military adopted the five gallon metal jerry can early in World War II. It has been used for gas, water and other liquids as a key component of military logistics, becoming a widely recognized basic item of military equipment. It has evolved from its German origins to the modern jerry cans in military use by NATO and many other countries. Civilian copies, by the millions, as well as surplus military jerry cans are found in every part of world.
Do not fill the can all the way to the top. Leave a couple inches of space for fume expansion due to temperature changes. This will also help thwart spills and overflow.